My dog – bless her – gets a bit whiffy between washes. Is there a way to keep her smelling nice without washing her every single week?

Oh, dogs. So adorable, so lovable… so stinky. As the owner of two dogs myself, I know where you’re coming from with this one. I love my dogs, but do I love the dank, fetid stink that seems to envelope them anywhere from 3-5 minutes after I’ve sent them to the groomer? No. No, I do not.

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If I had the time and the inclination, of course I would wash my dogs weekly. But I have other things to do – feed myself and my kids, keep the house clean, watch Game of Thrones, avoid Game of Thrones spoilers (practically a full-time job in itself) and spend a few hours thinking about all the crazy sh*t that happened on Game of Thrones this week – and I’m sure you do, too. So weekly washing is usually out of the question. So what to do about your – please don’t take this personally – gross dog and your lack of time to wash her?

The best solution, I’ve found, is to periodically sprinkle them with a sort of dry dog shampoo – similar to the sort you’d use on your own hair between shampoos.

There are actual, specific products you can buy for this purpose, but I find it much cheaper to make my own. It’s pretty simple, and happily, you’ll probably already own all of the ingredients.

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What you want is to absorb the smell from your dog’s fur – so you need to use a dry powder that will soak up the bacteria that’s causing the stink. Then, we’ll brush it away.

Grab a cup of bicarb or baking soda (this should be enough, unless you have a particularly large dog, in which case, use as much as you need), mix with a few drops of essential oil (lavender is good: it smells lovely and it also repels fleas) and sprinkle on your pup. Leave it there for as long as she will let you (my prediction? Not that long). Brush it out thoroughly and take a whiff. Smell better? Great.

If you don’t have bicarb or baking soda, you can also use cornflour, or in a pinch, talcum powder.

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